Yesterday’s terrorists, today’s refugees

The US Defense Department said on Friday that ISIS has no more territory
in Syria, according to White House spokeswoman. However, the conflict still has
many problems that are far from being solved. The main among them is a refugee
dilemma.
Al-Hawl, a displacement camp in Syria, is now full of the wives and children
of Islamic State fighters. The women scream at each other, children are crying and
the camp`s administration is afraid that dysentery can break out. Nevertheless,
these women are not pathetic refugees whose only desire is to escape the horrors
of war. Back in a day, they deliberately joined ISIS to help their husbands fight and
spill the blood. The Guardian reports that some women are determined to
establish strict rules in the camp by stealing property and even beating women
who decided to take off their niqabs. Even now, being in a camp, some of them
claim that the only reason why they left an ISIS-controlled territory is to make it
easier for their husbands to attack.
Until recently, one of them was a woman called Hoda Muthana with her
one-year-old son. Hoda is an American woman who joined ISIS forces in 2014
when she was only 15 years old. Muthana fled her home and escaped to Turkey.
After that, she arrived in the Syrian city of Raqqa where she married Australian
jihadist. At the time, she was one of the leading propagandists of a terror group
via different social media platforms. “Americans wake up! Men and women
altogether. You have much to do while you live under our greatest enemy, enough
of your sleeping! Go on drive-bys, and spill all of their blood, or rent a big truck
and drive all over them. Veterans, Patriots, Memorial, etc day … Kill them,” she
Twitted right after her husband was killed.
Last month, she and her son were captured by Kurdish forces while trying
to flee ISIS` remaining area. Muthana claims that she made a mistake and wants
to come back to the USA. A woman says that she was brainwashed and "deeply
regrets" all the problems she`s caused. “We were basically in the time of
ignorance […] and then became jihadi if you like to describe it that way. I thought I
was doing things correctly for the sake of God," the woman says to the Guardian.
Muthana now wants to have her American passport back and hopes to return to
the US in the near future.

Nonetheless, either American or European community cannot decide what
to do with refugees like Muthana. On the one hand, they are people who need
aid but on the other, they are former terrorists. It is evident, though, that people
who adjust their beliefs to the situation are dangerous to society. The
governments should ask the opinion of common people of whether they do want
to see refugees like this around them. The questions interesting the public will be
obvious. Why should we invest in people who do not stand for what we believe
in? Where are the guarantees that they do not switch into terrorism again? How
can we be one hundred percent safe with recent terrorists coming to our
countries?
Taking all of it into consideration, the most reasonable decision would be
not allowing potentially unstable people to enter Europe or the US. People who
made up their minds and decided to join ISIS forces are most likely to convert into
terrorist ideology at the very first opportunity. Either way, why did they choose to
flee Syria only when ISIS state is about to fall? Moreover, if a worldwide
community allows them to return it can give a green light to illegal terrorists who
will undeniably try to enter European countries. This, in turn, may lead to terrorist
attacks, clashes, and a highly unstable political situation. With Brexit, constant
Russian influence and regular strikes all over the region, Europe is hardly able to
deal with such a dangerous problem as terrorist refugees.

Diana Kravets